Results Components R&D

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Results Demonstration Projects

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ProjectCo-funding fromBudget
  • About

    Electro-mobility is seen by many as potential environmentally friendly technology that could have a significant influence on the future cost and environmental performance of transportation. While there is currently a great momentum vis-à-vis electro-mobility, it is yet unclear, if the deployment of electric vehicles (EV) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) is economically viable in the medium to long term, due to several uncertainties associated with technical and market challenges. Electro-mobility, in its early phase of deployment, still faces significant hurdles that need to be overcome in order to reach a greater market presence. Further progress is needed to overcome some of these hurdles. In turn, if successful, through its radically different powertrain, e-mobility could drastically change the positioning of personal vehicles in the market and technical environment.

    WHAT IS AN ELECTRIC VEHICLE?

    In a Battery Electric Vehicle (BEV) a battery pack and electric motor replace the petrol tank and internal combustion engine of a conventional vehicle. BEVs drive entirely on electricity.

    A Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) combines both battery pack and electric motor with an internal combustion engine. Both the electric motor and the internal combustion engine can drive the wheels. The battery pack is typically smaller than in a BEV. Several manufactures also offer PHEV models with significantly larger batteries and refer to them as "Electric vehicles with Range Extenders".

    All these vehicles are capable of being plugged into the electricity supply system.

    POTENTIAL ADVANTAGES of EV/PHEV

    • Lower environmental impact if powered by low-carbon electricity mix
    • Increased energy security through displacement of petroleum based fuels
    • Synergistic with non-dispatchable renewable electricity through demand management and storage (vehicle to grid)
    • Better air quality in urban areas
    • Reduced noise

    CURRENT TECHNICAL AND MARKET CHALLENGES of EV/PHEV

    • Battery performance and cost
    • Powertrain efficiency
    • System integration
    • Grid integration and interoperability including business model
    • Safety standards

    Member States and the EU provide financial measures to support a wide range of research, development and demonstration projects for electric vehicles. These measures aim at enhancing the short and long-term advantages of electric vehicles and overcoming the barriers to electric vehicle deployment.

    The EV-RADAR tool is a first attempt to collect all research, development and demonstration projects that are co-funded by different funding bodies of the EU and its Member States. It illustrates the projects that have more than 1mln Euro of total project budget. Associated with the tool, there is a report which can be downloaded here. As the projects progress and new projects arise, more information will be integrated. We would like to encourage you to give us feedback on the tool and its contents (including suggestions to update project descriptions and add new projects). Please use the feedback button for this.

  • About

    Electro-mobility is seen by many as potential environmentally friendly technology that could have a significant influence on the future cost and environmental performance of transportation. While there is currently a great momentum vis-à-vis electro-mobility, it is yet unclear, if the deployment of electric vehicles (EV) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) is economically viable in the medium to long term, due to several uncertainties associated with technical and market challenges. Electro-mobility, in its early phase of deployment, still faces significant hurdles that need to be overcome in order to reach a greater market presence. Further progress is needed to overcome some of these hurdles. In turn, if successful, through its radically different powertrain, e-mobility could drastically change the positioning of personal vehicles in the market and technical environment.

    WHAT IS AN ELECTRIC VEHICLE?

    In a Battery Electric Vehicle (BEV) a battery pack and electric motor replace the petrol tank and internal combustion engine of a conventional vehicle. BEVs drive entirely on electricity.

    A Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) combines both battery pack and electric motor with an internal combustion engine. Both the electric motor and the internal combustion engine can drive the wheels. The battery pack is typically smaller than in a BEV. Several manufactures also offer PHEV models with significantly larger batteries and refer to them as "Electric vehicles with Range Extenders".

    All these vehicles are capable of being plugged into the electricity supply system.

    POTENTIAL ADVANTAGES of EV/PHEV

    • Lower environmental impact if powered by low-carbon electricity mix
    • Increased energy security through displacement of petroleum based fuels
    • Synergistic with non-dispatchable renewable electricity through demand management and storage (vehicle to grid)
    • Better air quality in urban areas
    • Reduced noise

    CURRENT TECHNICAL AND MARKET CHALLENGES of EV/PHEV

    • Battery performance and cost
    • Powertrain efficiency
    • System integration
    • Grid integration and interoperability including business model
    • Safety standards

    Member States and the EU provide financial measures to support a wide range of research, development and demonstration projects for electric vehicles. These measures aim at enhancing the short and long-term advantages of electric vehicles and overcoming the barriers to electric vehicle deployment.

    The EV-RADAR tool is a first attempt to collect all research, development and demonstration projects that are co-funded by different funding bodies of the EU and its Member States. It illustrates the projects that have more than 1mln Euro of total project budget. Associated with the tool, there is a report which can be downloaded here. As the projects progress and new projects arise, more information will be integrated. We would like to encourage you to give us feedback on the tool and its contents (including suggestions to update project descriptions and add new projects). Please use the feedback button for this.

  • About

    Electro-mobility is seen by many as potential environmentally friendly technology that could have a significant influence on the future cost and environmental performance of transportation. While there is currently a great momentum vis-à-vis electro-mobility, it is yet unclear, if the deployment of electric vehicles (EV) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) is economically viable in the medium to long term, due to several uncertainties associated with technical and market challenges. Electro-mobility, in its early phase of deployment, still faces significant hurdles that need to be overcome in order to reach a greater market presence. Further progress is needed to overcome some of these hurdles. In turn, if successful, through its radically different powertrain, e-mobility could drastically change the positioning of personal vehicles in the market and technical environment.

    WHAT IS AN ELECTRIC VEHICLE?

    In a Battery Electric Vehicle (BEV) a battery pack and electric motor replace the petrol tank and internal combustion engine of a conventional vehicle. BEVs drive entirely on electricity.

    A Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) combines both battery pack and electric motor with an internal combustion engine. Both the electric motor and the internal combustion engine can drive the wheels. The battery pack is typically smaller than in a BEV. Several manufactures also offer PHEV models with significantly larger batteries and refer to them as "Electric vehicles with Range Extenders".

    All these vehicles are capable of being plugged into the electricity supply system.

    POTENTIAL ADVANTAGES of EV/PHEV

    • Lower environmental impact if powered by low-carbon electricity mix
    • Increased energy security through displacement of petroleum based fuels
    • Synergistic with non-dispatchable renewable electricity through demand management and storage (vehicle to grid)
    • Better air quality in urban areas
    • Reduced noise

    CURRENT TECHNICAL AND MARKET CHALLENGES of EV/PHEV

    • Battery performance and cost
    • Powertrain efficiency
    • System integration
    • Grid integration and interoperability including business model
    • Safety standards

    Member States and the EU provide financial measures to support a wide range of research, development and demonstration projects for electric vehicles. These measures aim at enhancing the short and long-term advantages of electric vehicles and overcoming the barriers to electric vehicle deployment.

    The EV-RADAR tool is a first attempt to collect all research, development and demonstration projects that are co-funded by different funding bodies of the EU and its Member States. It illustrates the projects that have more than 1mln Euro of total project budget. Associated with the tool, there is a report which can be downloaded here. As the projects progress and new projects arise, more information will be integrated. We would like to encourage you to give us feedback on the tool and its contents (including suggestions to update project descriptions and add new projects). Please use the feedback button for this.

  • Energy Systems

    Energy storage in electric vehicles is mainly provided through batteries which take the role of the fuel tank in conventional vehicles. Batteries in currently available electric vehicles are mainly Lithium based. Research and development in this area focuses on improving the performance and reducing the costs of Lithium based batteries, and on studying alternative energy storage means such as ultracapacitors or other types of batteries.

    Projects dealing with research and development, recycling of all energy storage types for electric vehicles are included in this category.

  • Electric motors

    Electric motors in electric vehicles propel the vehicle. When the vehicle slows down, the motor can recuperate energy. Research and development in this area focuses on cost and weight reduction, refinement of motor controls, alternative materials and on alternative concepts such as in-wheel-motors.

    Projects concerning the research and development of electric motors are included in this category.

  • Control Systems

    Control systems in electric vehicles represent the “brain” of the vehicle. They manage the interaction of the battery, electric motor, and power electronics. They optimize the energy management of the vehicle. Research and development in this area focuses on ensuring failure safe and robust control systems, optimization of energy management and on new electric architectures for future electric vehicle concepts.

    Projects in this category include research and development of all kind of control systems and their functions specific to electric vehicles.

  • Thermal management

    Thermal management systems of electric vehicles are responsible for the heating and cooling of vehicles. The temperature management of the vehicle and its components is a vital role as it ensures that not only the components but also the drivers and passengers do not suffer from stress induced by temperature. The sensitivity to temperature of batteries is indeed comparable to that of human beings, they do not like it too cold, but they also don’t like it too hot. Thermal management in an electric vehicle is challenging and a considerable energy consumer like an electric vehicle produces little waste heat (which in conventional vehicles is normally used to heat or cool the vehicle).

  • Vehicle body and architecture

    Vehicle body and architecture provides the structure of the vehicle and its outer shape. It is analogue to the bones and the skin of a human being. Electric vehicles provide challenges, but also opportunities to the body and architecture. A typical challenge in electric vehicles is the packaging of the (large and heavy) battery. A typical opportunity would be the use of in-wheel-motors, enabling new design freedom.

    Projects developing new electric vehicle concepts and designs are included in this category, as well as projects that develop dedicated architectures with improved aerodynamics, innovative lightweight materials and modular structures.

  • Chassis

    The chassis is an underpart of the vehicle. It consists of the underbody, suspension, axles, wheels, and brakes. Many of these parts have to be modified and adapted to electric vehicles in order to fully exploit potential efficiency improvements, such as brake energy recuperation, or to enable new concepts such as in-wheel-motors.

    The projects in this category cover research and development projects which deal with chassis components.

  • Charger

    Chargers of electric vehicles are responsible for recharging the battery in an electric vehicle or a plug-in hybrid vehicle, while it is plugged into the electricity network. There are generally two main types of charging systems: on-board or stationary. These charging systems are intended to complement one another, with each being more suitable for different charging scenarios (e.g. slow versus fast charging).

    Projects dealing with research and development of advanced charging solutions for electric vehicle are included in this category.

  • Others

    This category includes projects for modeling, coordination and monitoring of research and development for electric vehicles in Europe and projects that could not be associated to any of the other categories.

  • No information

    This component contains no information (yet).